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Atlin, BC 

The JCR program in Atlin is based on community led training with emphasis on JCR skills and participation in the enhanced summer training each year. Atlin (founded in 1898) is BC's most northwesterly community, about 180 km (112 mi) southeast of Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory. Tucked into the far northwestern tip of British Columbia, the remote and spectacularly beautiful community of Atlin graces the eastern shore of the mighty Atlin Lake, headwater of the Yukon River and named after the Tlingit word atlah, meaning 'Big Water'. The earliest known inhabitants of the area were the Tlingit First Nations people, who traveled through the broad valley on their annual hunting, fishing and trading migrations.


Carcross, YT

The JCR program in Carcross offers youth training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. At the northern tip of Bennett Lake, lies the village of Carcross. It lies 74 km south of Whitehorse and about 110 km north of Skagway, Alaska. It was once a hunting and fishing camp for Inland Tlingit and Tagish people, Carcross became a key stopover and supply centre during the Klondike Gold Rush. The White Pass and Yukon railway, extending from Skagway through Carcross to Whitehorse, was completed in 1900. Tourism has taken over as a mainstay of the local economy.


 Haines Junction, YT

Haines Junction offers an outstanding program for JCRs. There are 20 members who participate in traditional, life and ranger skills. Haines Junction is located at the junction of the Alaska Highway and Haines Highway, 98 miles west of Whitehorse. Population: (June 2008): 818. It is located on an early trade route used for trapping, hunting and fishing by the Coastal Tlingit and Chilkat peoples. The village itself was established in 1942. In 1980, Kluane National Park and Reserve was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The park encompasses a portion of the St. Elias Mountains, including Mount Logan, Canada's highest peak.


Carmacks Patrol

The JCR Programme in Carmacks in growing with training in traditional, life and rangers skills. Carmacks region was part of the traditional fishing, hunting, trapping and trading area of the Northern Tutchone people. For generations their fish camps harvested the annual salmon runs at the confluence of the Yukon and Nordenskiold Rivers. The camps were used for hunting when the caribou crossed the river in the fall. The region was also an important trading centre where the local Indians met the Southern Tutchone from the southwestern Yukon, as well as the Tagish and inland Tlingit from southern B.C. and southern Yukon. Today Carmacks has a year-round population of about 500 people.


Pelly Crossing, YT

The Pelly Crossing JCR patrol has 20 members participating in traditional, life and ranger skills. The community of Pelly Crossing is located along the Klondike Highway and on the bank of the Pelly River, 282 kilometers northwest of Whitehorse and 254 km southeast of Dawson City. Both hunting and fishing are important community activities as well as a source of food. When the salmon run takes place, the village vacates and people move to their cabins, or fish camps, near the river. Fish are caught and preserved for winter use. Originally, Pelly Crossing was used by Selkirk people as a campsite along the way to Ta'Tla Mun. The people of the First Nation settled near the traditional site of Fort Selkirk on the Yukon River.


Mayo, YT

The JCR program in Mayo receive community led training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Mayo, Yukon is located in the central part of the Yukon Territory, which is in the Na Cho Nyak Dun traditional territory, is marked on tourist maps as "The Silver Trail". Mayo has a long and interesting history in the Lumber and Mining industries. The Little Mississippi and York rivers, once major routes in the days of the log drives, provide canoeists with a variety of challenges. Wildlife enthusiasts will enjoy the abundance of deer and moose in the area.


Dawson City, YT

The Dawson City JCR patrol consists of about 20 members and is very active in training using ranger, traditional and life skills. Dawson City is located on the North Klondike Highway, 328 miles (525 km) north of Whitehorse with a population of (June 2008): 1,889. Dawson City was founded in 1896 as the Gateway to the Klondike Gold Fields. Following the historic discovery of gold on Bonanza Creek in August of 1896, Dawson City grew out of a marshy swamp near the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike Rivers. The population fluctuated between 30,000 and 40,000 people. Today, Dawson may be a city with a past, but its future still looks bright.


Old Crow, YT

The JCR youth in this community takes part in traditional, life and ranger skills. Old Crow is an isolated community, being the only village in the Yukon, which does not have road access. The community is located north of the Arctic Circle. People in Old Crow enjoy long summer days and experience the short days of winter. The Gwitchin First Nation extends throughout the Yukon, the northwest part of NWT and parts of Alaska. They rely heavily on the land and on the Porcupine Caribou Herd for our food, shelter and medicines.


Fort McPherson, NT

There are 22 JCR's in the Fort McPherson Patrol. The focus of activities is on ranger, traditional skills and life skills. Fort McPherson is located on the Peel River at 67°26'N and 134°53'W, 121 km south of Inuvik and 1107 km northwest of Yellowknife. Beadwork of artists creates distinctive traditional items. Dene mukluks and other wares are made from a variety of skins including moose and caribou. The Hudson's Bay Company established a post in 1840, and in 1848 the area was named after Murdoch McPherson, chief company trader.


Aklayik, NT

There are about 17 JCRs who participating in the program, members also take part in the enhanced summer training each year. Aklayik is situated on the west side of the Mackenzie Delta, approximately 1.6 degrees above the Arctic Circle The closest travel destination to Aklavik by major roads is to Inuvik, land travel also includes the ice roads chartered boat and plane. Aklavik is home of the barrenland grizzly. Aklavik is been a multi-ethnic town, home to Inuvialuit, Metis, Gwich'in and non-aboriginal cultures. The Aklavik Trapper's Rendezvous is held annually over Easter weekend. The festival includes: dog and snowmobile racing, community feasts, drum dancing, fun games, cultural events and much more.


Tuktoyaktuk, NT

23 JCR's are members of the Tuktoyaktuk Patrol. The focus of activities is on ranger, traditional skills and life skills. Tuktoyaktuk (commonly called "Tuk") is located on Kugmallit Bay near the Mackenzie River Delta at 69°27'N and 133°02'W, 137 km north of Inuvik and 1,130 km northwest of Yellowknife. The traditional name of the community is Tuktuujaartuq, which means "looks like a caribou". Tuk is accessible only by air during the summer. In the winter, a 150 kilometre long ice road provides access to the community. Tuk has a population of 990, of which 95% are Inuvialuit (Inuit).


Tsiigehtchic, NT

The JCR program in Tsiigehtchic offers youth training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training program each year. Tsiigehtchic is located at the confluence of the Arctic Red River and the Mackenzie River at 67'27'N latitude and 133'44'W longitude. The community is 96 km south of Inuvik and is 1011 km northwest of Yellowknife and has a population of 177. The community was established in 1868 as a traditional fishing camp. Tradition is still alive and well in Tsiigehtchic with trapping, fishing and hunting still being key aspects of many residents livelihood.


Fort Good Hope, NT

The Fort Good Hope patrol has 17 youth that participate in the JCR program. The aim of the JCR program is to develop the attributes in youth of traditional, life and JCR skills. Fort Good Hope is located at 66'15'N latitude and 128'38'W longitude, 805 air km northwest of Yellowknife, on a peninsula between Jackfish Creek and the east bank of the Mackenzie River where the two meet. The community is accessible by air from Inuvik and Norman Wells year round. In the winter an ice road connects Fort Good Hope to communities on the Mackenzie Highway system. The community's economy is based on traditional activities including hunting and trapping.


Tulita, NT

The JCR program in Tulita has 20 youth that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Tulita, pop 505 (2006c) was formerly known as Fort Norman. The hamlet's traditional name, which it took in 1996, reflects the community's location, "where the waters meet." Tulita is located at the junction of the Mackenzie River and Great Bear River, which empties Great Bear Lake. The site has always been of seasonal importance to the Slavey Dene. The hunting, fishing, and trapping life of the Dene is supplemented by employment in the oil industry at Norman Wells, 85 km downstream on the Mackenzie River.


Sacks Harbour, NT

The JCR program in Sacks Harbour receives training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Sachs Harbour is located on the southwestern shore of Banks Island at 71'59N latitude and 125'14'W longitude. The most northerly community in the Northwest Territories, Sachs Harbour is 523 km northeast of Inuvik and has a population of 130. Sachs Harbour was named after the ship 'Mary Sachs' of the Canadian Arctic Expedition of 1913. The local economy is based primarily on hunting and trapping and to a lesser degree on tourism. Oil and gas exploration continues in the Beaufort Sea.


Ulukhaktok

The JCR program in Ulukhaktok has 47 youth that receive community led training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Ulukhaktok, pop 406, is located on the shores of Kings Bay and Queens Bay, on the western side of Victoria Island, at 70'43'N latitude and 117'45'W longitude. The community is 925 km north of Yellowknife. Traditionally the Copper Inuit have lived on Holman Island. The community's economy is linked heavily with the arts and crafts industry with printmaking being key. Trapping, hunting and fishing are still practiced and to a lesser degree oil and gas exploration.


Paulatuk, NT

The JCR program in Paulatuk receive community led training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Paulatuk is located at 69'21'N latitude and 124'04'W longitude on Darnley Bay. It is 402 km east of Inuvik and 885 km northwest of Yellowknife and has a population of about 324. Paulatuk was named for the coal that was found and used by the Inuit when they settled there in the early 1920s. Hunting, fishing and trapping are the major economic activities along with arts and crafts being an important part of the local tradition in this hamlet.


Wha Ti, NT

The JCR program in Wha Ti has 30 youth that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Wha Ti, pop 483, is located 164 air km northwest of Yellowknife at 63'08'N latitude and 117'06'W longitude. The community is accessible by air from Yellowknife year round (limited scheduled service). A winter road connects the community to the Mackenzie Highway at Behchoko. Wha Ti is an area rich in wildlife and is a traditional hunting area of the Tlicho people. Today the Tlicho maintain a traditional lifestyle and economy based almost solely on trapping, fishing and hunting. The community changed its name to Wha Ti from Lac La Martre in 1996.


Fort Providence, NT

The Fort Providence patrol has 44 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR program. The aim of the JCR program is to develop the attributes in youth of traditional, life and JCR skills. Fort Providence is located on the north-east bank of the Mackenzie River, 233 air km south-west of Yellowknife at 61'216 N latitude, 117'396 W longitude. The Hamlet is 72.4 air km from the west reaches of Great Slave Lake. The Yellowknife Chipewyan established a post following the arrival of Alexander Mackenzie in the 1920s. Today the economy is based on the Mackenzie Highway traffic, the ferry crossing and provision of services to local residents and travelers.


Fort Resolution, NT

The Fort Resolution patrol has 22 JCR youth that participate in the program. The aim of the JCR program is to develop the attributes in youth of traditional, life and JCR skills. Fort Resolution is built on a peninsula (ranging from 158 to 163 m above sea level) southwest of the Slave River Delta on the south shore of Great Slave Lake. The community is located at 61'11'N Latitude and 113'41'W longitude and is 153 air km from Yellowknife. The population is 510 (2007 Census). The Northwest Company trading post was first established on the Slave River delta in 1786. Logging/sawmilling is the primary source of income along with trapping, hunting and domestic fishing.


Lutsel K'E

The JCR program in Lutsel k'e has 28 youth that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Located on a peninsula extending into Christie Bay on the south shore of the East Arm on Great Slave Lake, Lutsel K'e is located at 62'24'N latitude and 110'44'W longitude and is 201 air km east of Yellowknife. The most northerly Chipewyan community, Lutsel K'e has been established since 1925 when the Hudson Bay Company Post was set up. The local economy is largely traditionally based although arts and crafts and tourism is important especially sport fishing.


Kugluktuk

The JCR program in Kugluktuk has 30 youth that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. Kugluktuk is located at 67.82 N, 115.15 W. It is the most westerly community of Nunavut with a population of approximately 1362. Kugluktukmiut still rely heavily on hunting and fishing as traditional support to their families. Because of our close proximity to the tree line, there is a combination of wildlife that is unique to Kugluktuk. Outdoor activities include hiking, fishing, hunting and photography. In summer, canoeists and rafters can take the popular route down the historic Coppermine River to Kugluktuk.


Resolute Bay

The Resolute Bay JCR patrol offers youth the opportunity to learn about traditional, life and JCR skills. Youth also have an opportunity to take part in summer training each year. Resolute Bay is the second most northern community in Canada . Situated on the south coast of Cornwallis Island, its takes its name from the ship - HMS Resolute, one of the vessels that came in search of the lost British expedition under Sir John Franklin. This is also the jumping-off point for explorations to the North Pole and the magnetic north pole. More and more tourists now visit Resolute, attracted by the "land of the midnight sun" and its denizens. The name of the settlement in inuktitut is Qausuittuq, which translated means "the place with no dawn". The population is 215 (2001 Census).


Grise Fiord

The JCR program in Grise Fiord offers a youth program with a focus on traditional, life and ranger skills. Each year members are given the opportunity to participate in the enhanced summer training program. The northernmost community of Canada, Grise Fiord is located in the High Arctic on Ellesmere Island. Picturesque and remote, it is surrounded by high hills and, for most of the year, sea ice. In fact, the Inuktitut name for Grise Fiord is Aujuittuq, "the place that never thaws out." Visitors come to Grise Fiord to witness its spectacular beauty and wildlife. It is also a stopover for researchers traveling either to Ellesmere Island or to the famed "Ancient Forest" on Axel Heiberg Island. The population of Grise Fiord is 150.


Gjoa Haven

The Gjoa Haven JCR Patrol has over 100 youth. Members from this patrol participate in the Enhanced Training Session camp each year. Gjoa Haven: means "lots of fat", which refers to the abundance of blubbery sea mammals in the nearby waters, is a hamlet in Nunavut, above the Arctic Circle, located in the Kitikmeot Region, 1,056 km (656 mi) northeast of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. It is the only settlement on King William Island. The name Gjoa Haven is from the Norwegian "Gjøahavn" or "Gjøa's Harbour", and was named by polar explorer Roald Amundsen after his ship Gjøa.


Taloyoak

The JCR Patrol in Taloyoak offers 79 youth training in traditional, life and ranger skills. Sitting at the foot of a series of rocky hills on the shores of a small body of water known as Stanners Harbour, Taloyoak is the northernmost community on the Canadian mainland (69° 32' north latitude). Population: 639 (1996 census); 92% Inuit; approximately 60% aged 24 and under. The word taloyoak means "large caribou blind" in Inuktitut, and refers to a stone caribou blind traditionally used by Inuit of the area to corral and harvest caribou. The traditional inhabitants of the Taloyoak (pronounced "ta-low-ruaq") area were the Netsilik Inuit, the Netsilingmiut, a people largely sustained by the abundance of seals in the region, which provided their main source of food and clothing.


Kugaaruk

The Kugaaruk patrol has 49 youth that participate in the traditional, life and JCR skills with some members attending the summer JCR Programme each year. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop the attributes in youth of traditional, life and ranger skills. Located at 68°N by 89°W on the southwest shore of the Simpson Peninsula, Kugaaruk, (Pelly Bay), has been known for generations amongst the Inuit as excellent seal hunting grounds. On the map of Canada, we are on the east side of Pelly Bay at the mouth of the Peter River in the new Territory of Nunavut. The town has a population of 542 and is growing very fast. Almost everyone who lives in Kugaaruk are Inuit.


Hall Beach

The JCR program in Hall Beach consists of over 40 members and participates in traditional, life and ranger skills. Hall Beach (pop. ˜ 700), is a small Inuit community in the eastern Northwest Territories of Canada (Nunavut as of April 1, 1999) and is located at the north eastern tip of Melville peninsula at the shores of Foxe Basin, a narrow strait across from Baffin Island. Also referred to as a hamlet because of its size, Hall Beach holds the distinction as one of the few permanently populated communities north of the Arctic Circle at 68° North and 81° West. The main occupation of the populace here is hunting, fishing and Inuit crafts.


Whale Cove

The JCR program in Whale Cove has 29 youth that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training each year. The community of Whale Cove, or Tikirarjuaq (long point), is nestled within a bay, along the western shore of Hudson Bay. The cove is located north of Arviat, just south of Rankin Inlet. The community was initially settled by three distinct Inuit groups (one inland and two coastal), who came to the area during the settlement development of the 1950s. Today, Whale Cove, pop 350, remains a mainly traditional community, with diverging dialects and cultures, originating from both inland and coastal traditions.


Chesterfield Inlet

The JCR Patrol in this hamlet offers about 30 youth a good community program aimed at JCR skills and participation in the enhanced summer training each year. The town is located within Nunavut (previously the Northwest Territories) on the West coast of Hudson Bay in Canada's far North at 63 degrees 20' North, 90 degrees 42'W, which is 101 km NE of Rankin Inlet and 1,147 air km's E of Yellowknife. Named about 1749, after Philip Dormer (Stanhope), 4th Earl of CHESTERFIELD (1694-1773) who was the Secretary of State from 1746-48 and is the well known author of "Chesterfield's Letters" and other works. According to the NWT Language Bureau, the traditional Inuktituk name for this Chesterfield Inlet is Igluligaarjuk, which means 'place with few houses.'


Coral Harbour

The Coral Harbour JCR patrol has 40 youth involved in traditional, life and JCR skill training. Each year selected members from the patrol participate in the enhanced summer training camp. Coral Harbour is located on Southampton Island in the northern reaches of Hudson Bay. Its Inuktitut name, Salliq, translates roughly as the flat island in front of the mainland (the Inuktitut name for the island and the community is the same). The name Coral Harbour is derived from the fact that one can find pieces of pink fossilized coral in the water near town. Coral Harbour is home to approximately 800 people of whom 97% are Inuit. Most people in town get around by snowmobile in the winter or ATV during the short summer months.


Clyde River

The Clyde River JCR patrol offers about 40 youth a community led program in traditional, life and ranger skills. Members also participate in the enhanced summer training program each year. Clyde River, which is Kangiqtugaapik or "nice little inlet" to the Inuit, can be found on the eastern shore of Baffin Island in the shelter of Patricia Bay. It is located on a flood plain, surrounded by spectacular fiords that stretch all the way into the Barnes Icecap. The mountains, icebergs and glaciers in the Clyde River area attract rock and ice climbers from around the world. Potential exports include halibut and shrimp, clams, seal and caribou meat. Clyde River has a population of about 850.


Qikiqtarjuaq

The Qikiqtarjuaq JCR Progam offers 44 youth a solid community led training program in traditional, life and JCR skills. Qikiqtarjuaq, formerly known as Broughton Island, is located just off the east coast of Baffin Island. Although the island is referred to as "the big island" as its Inuktitut name suggests, the island is only 12 km wide by 16 km long. One of the more traditional communities in Nunavut, Qikiqtarjuaq is known for its traditional Inuit and modern clothing, including sealskin parkas and kamiit (boots). Abundant wildlife and beautiful scenery attract visitors to Qikiqtarjuaq. The Auyuittuq National Park can be accessed via Qikiqtarjuaq. Qikiqtarjuaq is also known as the 'Iceberg and Diving Capital of Nunavut'. Population: 550.


Pangnirtung

The Pangnirtung JCR patrol has 42 youth and offers traditional, life and JCR rangers skills training. Youth also participate in the enhanced summer training camp each year. Settled at the bottom of a mountain, at the mouth of a river and surrounded by spectacular fiords, Pangnirtung is located on Baffin Island, in Cumberland Sound. Pangnirtung is famed for its art and the acclaimed "Pang" hats, colourfully-patterned crocheted toques made by local craftspeople, can also be purchased at the local Arts Centre's gift shop. Pangnirtung Fisheries contributes to the community's economy through the harvesting and processing of arctic char and Baffin turbot (Greenland halibut), a newly-modernized processing plant prepares the daily catch of fish for shipment to international locations. Population: 1550. The Town is only 7.54 sq Km.


Kimmirut

The JCR program in Kimmirut offers weekly meeting to 25+ youth with community led training based on traditional, life and ranger skills. Youth from Kimmirut also participate in the enhanced summer training camp each year. The community of Kimmirut, previously known as Lake Harbour, is a picturesque town located on the southern coast of Baffin Island, near the mouth of the Soper River. Hikers access the Katannilik Territorial Park Reserve from just outside the community. Outdoor pursuits enjoyed in the area are sea kayaking, canoeing, and hunting. Many of Kimmirut's residents are renowned carvers whose art is sold and collected worldwide. The population of Kimmirut is 500+.


Cape Dorset

The JCRs in Cape Dorset offer youth a good program aimed towards JCR goals. Carving and graphic art have now become the economic mainstay of the community. It was at Cape Dorset that the remains of an ancient Inuit people, who flourished between 1000 B.C. and 1100 A.D., were found. They were called the "Dorset Culture" afer Cape Dorset. The Baffin Inuit of Cape Dorset are descendents of the later "Thule Culture" knowns by their legends as the "Tunlit". The "cape" on Dorset Island is actually a 243 meter [798 feet] high mountain, part of the Kinngait Range. Kinngait means "high mountain" in Inuktitut, hence the name of the community. Transportation to Cape Dorset is bi-weekly by air.


Sanikiluaq

The JCR program in Sanikiluaq has 68 members that receive training in traditional, life and ranger skills. JCRs can also apply to attend the enhance summer training program each year. Sanikiluaq is located on the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay. It is the most Southern Community in Nunavut and it's in the Heart of Hudson Bay. The island is located about 100 kilometers west of Northern Quebec. The population of the community is 815 and still growing. People go hunting all year round. Knowledge of the land if important to go hunting since there is a 100% chance of getting lost. The economy relies on fishing and trapping and is famous for its soapstone carvings and intricate reed basketry.


Waskaganish

Created on 8 November 2002, the Waskaganish JCR Patrol has a membership of 17 youth who participate in local and summer training. Waskaganish is sometimes considered the oldest Cree settlement. It was a meeting place for the Cree and Europeans to trade when the Hudson Bay Company established its first trading post, Fort Charles, in 1670. Waskaganish, meaning "little house," dates back to the 18th century, when the Hudson Bay Company's trading post became an outpost to Eastmain's more important establishment. Population: 2,105 Location: Latitude 51 12' North - Longitude 78 46' West


Eastmain

Created on 15 June 2002, the Eastmain JCR Patrol has a membership of 14 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Eastmain is located on the eastern coast of James Bay and the southern shore of the Eastmain river. It is home to the regional association of Cree trappers whose role it is to support local Cree trappers in maintaining traditional practices. The Eastmain post was the only eastern coast trading post for most of the 18th century. Population: 700 Location: Latitude 52 11' North - Longitude 78 10' West


Wemindji

Created on 24 April 2003, the Wemindji JCR Patrol has a membership of 47 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. At the mouth of the Maquatua River lies Wemindji - painted mountains. The name originates from the ochre found in the hills. This ochre was mixed with grease to make paint. This small community, once located on an island on Vieux-Comptoir River, was also called Paint Hills, Old Factory and Vieux-Comptoir. In 1959, the village was moved toward the coast where overall conditions were more favourable. Population: 1,100 Location: Latitude 52 55' North - Longitude 78 47' West


Kuujjuarapik

Created on 1 January 1998, the Kuujjuarapik JCR Patrol has a membership of 15 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Kuujjuarapik is nestled in golden sand dunes at the mouth of the Great Whale River. Kuujjuarapik is Nunavik's southernmost village. It is also unique as it is a bicultural community of Inuit (Kuujjuarapik) and Cree (Whapmagoostui). Ancestors of the Inuit, as well as Cree, have occupied the area for roughly 2800 years. Population: 525 Location: Latitude 55 17' North - Longitude 77 45' West


Whapmagoostui

Created on 14 March 2001, the Whapmagoostui JCR Patrol has a membership of 18 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Whapmagoostui ("Beluga River") is located at the northernmost part of Cree territories in Quebec, at the mouth of the Great Whale River feeding into the Hudson Bay. Whapmagoostui remains the only Cree community without access by land. Traditionally, northern Cree would get to the mouths of the Great and Small Whale Rivers in the summer to hunt for beluga, trade and to socialize. Population: 720 Location: Latitude 55 15' North - Longitude 77 45' West


Umiujaq

Created on 15 March 1999, the Umiujaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 11 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Located about 160 km north of Kuujjuarapik, Umiujaq was established in 1986. In light of the La Grande hydro-electric project and the proposed Great Whale hydro-electric project, Inuit negotiated a clause into the 1975 James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement that provided for the relocation of Inuit from Kuujjuarapik to the Guillaume-Delisle Lake. Population: 315 Location: Latitude 56 33' North - Longitude 76 33' West


Inukjuak

Created on 15 September 1996, the Inukjuak JCR Patrol has a membership of 31 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Inukjuak is located on the north bank of the Innuksuak river, known for its turquoise water and turbulent rapids. A post office and a Royal Canadian Mounted Police attachment were opened in 1935, a nursing station in 1947 and a school in 1951. In 1962, the co-operative store opened and, in 1980, Inukjusk was legally established as a municipality. Population: 1,456 Location : Latitude 58 27' North - Longitude 78 06' West


Puvirnituq

Created on 9 September 1995, the Puvirnituq JCR Patrol has a membership of 69 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Two explanations are commonly given for the peculiar name of this village. The first recounts that many years ago, migrating caribou attempted to cross the river, but many were swept downstream and drowned. Their carcasses, it seems, were washed up on shore where they began to rot, producing a putrid odour. The other explanation of the site's name tells how everyone living in the area were once the victims of a deadly epidemic. In the end, there was no one left to bury the dead bodies. When the corpses began to decompose, the air was filled with an awful stench. Population: 1,476 Location: Latitude 60 02' North - Longitude 77 17' West


Akulivik

Created on 11 September 1996, the Akulivik JCR Patrol has a membership of 20 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Akulivik is located on the north end of the Hudson Bay and takes its name from the surrounding geography: a peninsula that juts into the bay evoking the shape of a kakivak (a traditional, trident-shaped spear used for fishing). The Hudson Bay Company established a trading post on the site of today's Akulivik in 1922 and the Inuit then started to gradually settle in the surrounding area. Population: 536 Location: Latitude 60 48' North - Longitude 78 12' West


Inujivik

Created on 15 September 1997, the Inujivik JCR Patrol has a membership of 20 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Roughly 2,000 km north of Montreal, Ivujivik is Quebec's northernmost village. Nestled in a small, sandy cove, the village is surrounded by imposing cliffs that plunge into the tormented waters of Digges Sound, where the strong currents of the Hudson Bay and the Hudson Strait clash. Population: 327 Location: Latitude 62 25' North - Longitude 77 55' West


Salluit

Created on 13 September 1995, the Salluit JCR Patrol has a membership of 18 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Salluit stands at the far end of the narrow Sugluk Inlet, 10 km inland from the Hudson Strait, hidden between high, rugged mountains rising close to 500 m. An explanation for the name of this village recounts that, long ago, some Inuit were told the region abounded in wildlife. Yet when they arrived, they found almost nothing to eat and, as a result, suffered near starvation. Population: 1,249 Location: Latitude 62 12' North - Longitude 75 38' West


Kangiqsujuaq

Created on 17 September 1997, the Kangiqsujuaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 23 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Kangiqsujuaq is located north of the Cape Smith belt, an area rich in mineralization. Wakeham Bay takes its name from Captain William Wakeham who, in 1897, led an expedition to determine whether the Hudson Strait was safe for navigation. In 1961, the settlement was renamed Sainte-Anne-de-Maricourt, until with the establishment of a municipality it officially readopted its Inuktitut name, Kangiqsujuaq. Population: 591 Location: Latitude 61 35' North - Longitude 71 57' West


Quaqtaq

Created on 24 February 1998, the Quaqtaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 12 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The village of Quaqtaq is located on the eastern shore of Diana Bay. Up until the early 1930s, the location was known as Nuvukutaaq (the long point). However, according to stories still told, a man who once came to the area to hunt beluga found live parasites in his faeces. His hunting companions began to call the place Quaqtaq (tapeworm), and the use of this new name spread rapidly. Population: 330 Location: Latitude 61 02' North - Longitude 69 38' West


Kangirsuk

Created on 25 February 1998, the Kangirsuk JCR Patrol has a membership of 9 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Kangirsuk means "the bay" in Inuktitut. In 1981, Kangirsuk was incorporated as a municipality. Not far from the village on Pamiok Island, archaeologists have discovered a stone foundation of what is believed to be long house used by Vikings, who are said to have visited the area in the 11th century. Population: 460 Location: Latitude 60 01' North - Longitude 70 01' West


Aupaluk

Created on 16 March 1999, the Aupaluk JCR Patrol has a membership of 18 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The community is named after the colour of its ferruginous soil. Aupaluk is located on the northern reaches of the Labrador Trough which is rich in iron deposits. There was even mining activity in the region in the late 1950s. Aupaluk is the first village of the Canadian Arctic to have been entirely designed by Inuit. Population: 177 Location: Latitude 59 18' North - Longitude 69 36' West


Tasiujaq

Created on 15 September 1996, the Tasiujaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 20 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Tasiujaq, which means 'resembling a lake,' actually refers to the whole of the basin formed by the lake. Leaf Basin is renowned for its high tides which regularly exceed 15 metres (the world record). Population: 277 Location: Latitude 58 42' North - Longitude 69 56' West


Kuujjuaq

Created on 17 September 1995, the Kuujjuaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 73 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Kuujjuaq, Nunavik's largest community, is located on the west shore of the Koksoak River. The construction of a U.S. Air Force base (Crystal 1) in 1942 on the west shore of the Koksoak River, the site of today's settlement, and the occupation of the site by the American army between 1941 and 1945 sped up the development of the community. After the end of World War II, the United States turned the base over to the Canadian government. Population: 2,250 Location: Latitude 58 06' North - Longitude 68 24' West


Kangiqsualujjuaq

Created on 17 March 1999, the Kangiqsualujjuaq JCR Patrol has a membership of 38 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The construction of the village began in 1962 and, a few years later, all inhabitants of George River lived in prefabricated houses. A school was built in 1963 as well as a co-operative store and government buildings. In 1980, Kangiqsualujjuaq was legally established as a municipality. Population: 856 Location: Latitude 58 41' North - Longitude 65 57' West


Kawawachikamach

Created on 15 February 2003, the Kawawachikamach JCR Patrol has a membership of 54 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The Kawawachikamach Reserve is located 15 kilometres northeast of Schefferville, near Lake Matemace. Kawawachikamach means "windy lake" or "winding river that turns into a big lake." The Naskapi of Kawawachikamak are made up of roughly 680 members, with the majority of them living in the town of Kawawachikamach. Population: 783 Location: Latitude 55 10' North - Longitude 66 52' West


Schefferville

Created on 15 May 2003, the Schefferville JCR Patrol has a membership of 37 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The city of Schefferville was born in 1947, when the first permanent prospecting facilities were built. The Iron Ore Company of Canada ceased activities in Schefferville in 1982, after which almost all of the city's citizens left. Schefferville takes its name from Bishop Lionel Scheffer, who served as the Vicar Apostolic of Labrador (1945-1966). Population: 845 Location: Latitude 55 10' North - Longitude 66 52' West


Mingan

Created on 29 March 2000, the Mingan JCR Patrol has a membership of 21 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The community is located on the edge of the St. Lawrence River, 200 km to the east of Sept-Ïles and 28 km to the west of Havre-Saint-Pierre. It covers a surface area of 18.13 km2 and is accessible by Route 138. Sixty-seven per cent of the population is under 35 years of age. At the economic level, the community is working to develop the commercial fisheries sector. Population: 573 Location: Latitude 50 18' North - Longitude 64 02' West


Havre-Saint-Pierre

Created on 15 November 2000, the Havre-Saint-Pierre JCR Patrol has a membership of 17 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Havre-Saint-Pierre was so named in honour of the patron saint of fishermen, Saint Pierre. In the middle of the 20th century, a new industry developed when titanium mines were discovered 45 km north of the town. This industry grew and titanium mining is currently the town's main economic activity. Population: 3,150 Location: Latitude 50 14' North - Longitude 63 36' West


Natashquan

Created on 24 March 2001, the Natashquan JCR Patrol has a membership of 33 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Natashquan is located on the shores of the Gulf of St. Lawrence; the reserve is situated 376 km to the east of Sept-Îles and covers a surface area of 20.63 hectares. Seventy-four per cent of the population is under 35 years of age. The main economic activities are associated with outfitting, commercial fisheries and construction. Population: 932 Location: Latitude 50 11' North - Longitude 61 49' West


La Romaine

Created on day month 2009, the La Romaine JCR Patrol has a membership of 31 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. La Romaine, located at the mouth of the Olomane River, holds a small French-speaking population and a large Innu community known as Unamen Shipu. La Romaine means red ochre, alluding to the reddish colour of Spring's surface runoff. Today, many residents work in the lobster fishing industry and in private sport fishing camps. Population: 1,050 Location: Latitude 50 13' North - Longitude 60 40' West


Chevery

Created on 15 November 1999, the Chevery JCR Patrol has a membership of 17 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Chevery is the youngest Lower North Shore village. It is nestled in a sandy bay near the mouth of the roaring Netagamiou river. The village offers an incredible view of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. Its location between the Netagamiou and La Croix rivers makes it an ideal spot for outdoor activities, hunting and fishing. Population: 300 Location: Latitude 50 28' North - Longitude 59 36' West


Harrington Harbour

Created on day month 2010 (date forthcoming), the Harrington Harbour JCR Patrol has a membership of 25 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Justly featured among the thirty most beautiful villages of Quebec, Harrington Harbour resembles a typical small Newfoundland fishing port. A characteristic walkway made of wooden boards crosses through the community, going beyond the picturesque wooden houses. Population: 300 Location: Latitude 50° 30' North - Longitude 59° 28' West


La Tabatière

Created on 9 March 1998, the La Tabatière JCR Patrol has a membership of 38 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. The name Tabatière comes from the Aboriginal word tabaquen, meaning sorcerer. Innu who traded with settlers in La Tabatière usually consulted a sorcerer-soothsayer before heading on a hunting trip. Today, La Tabatière's fish plant is the largest on the Coast, processing crab, scallops and shrimp. Population: 499 Location: Latitude 50 49' North - Longitude 58 57' West


St. Augustine

Created on 25 March 2001, the St. Augustine JCR Patrol has a membership of 29 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. St. Augustine, one of the largest villages on the Lower North Shore, is located on the east bank of the St. Augustine River, across from the Innu community of Pakua Shipi. Spread out across undulating hills, the village is striking with the sandy banks of the St. Augustine River in the foreground. Population: 791 Location: Latitude 51 13' North - Longitude 58 39' West


St-Paul's River

Created on 8 March 1999, the St-Paul's River JCR Patrol has a membership of 35 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. St. Paul's River is located on a serene bay sheltered by a cluster of islands, near the mouth of a world-class salmon-fishing river by the same name. The village is one of the oldest settlements on the Lower North Shore. The river was once known as Eskimo River, after the Inuit who lived near its mouth. Population: 468 Location: Latitude 51 28' North - Longitude 57 42' West


Blanc-Sablon

Created on 28 February 2002, the Blanc-Sablon JCR Patrol has a membership of 46 youths who participate in local and summer training. The JCR Programme aims to help young people develop leadership skills and deepen their knowledge of Rangers, traditional lifestyles and basic skills. Blanc-Sablon is a pleasant coastal village located only a few kilometres from the Labrador border. Close to the Belle Isle Strait, Blanc-Sablon is one of the best places in Quebec to see icebergs. It is a vibrant community that acts as the coast's eastern gatekeeper. Historically, Blanc-Sablon was an important fishing port. Population: 350 Location: Latitude 51 25' North - Longitude 57 08' West


Mishkeegogamang

The Mishkeegogamang First Nation patrol was first established in 2004 and has 17 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Mishkeegogaman is an Ojibwa First Nation community with a population of 1,500 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located on Highway 599 approximately 50 kilometers south of Pickle Lake, ON at 51 03 54 N latitude, 90 16 23 W longitude. Mishkeegogamang is made up of separate communities several kms apart. The main reserve accommodates the sub-communities of Bottle Hill, Poplar Heights and Sandy Road. A smaller portion of the reserve, just to the north, called Ten Houses is also part of the reserve. Mishkeeggogamang is one of only 2 communities within 3 CRPG's Area of Operations that is accessible by road year round.


Sandy Lake

The Sandy Lake JCR patrol was first established in 1999 and has 49 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers and a few Elders. Sandy Lake First Nation has a population of 2,450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53 04 26 N latitude, 93 19 33 W longitude, 500kms Northwest of Thunder Bay, ON. Sandy Lake is home to Oji-Cree First Nation residence that has lived in the area for centuries. The people of Sandy Lake were hunters and gathers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Sandy Lake is accessible only by air except for a few months between January and March when a seasonal winter road allows vehicle access to the Northern Ontario highway system.


Sachigo Lake

The Sachigo Lake JCR patrol was first established in 2000 and has 32 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers and a few Elders. Sachigo Lake has a population of 450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53 53 38 N latitude, 92 09 43 W longitude approximately 425 kilometers north of Sioux Lookout, ON. Sachigo Lake is an Oji-Cree community. The people of Sachigo Lake were hunters and gatherers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Sachigo Lake is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal "Winter Road" links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.


Muskrat Dam

The Muskrat Dam JCR patrol was first established in 2003 and has 33 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Muskrat Dam has a population of 385 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53 21 43 N latitude, 91 50 49 W longitude 400kms north of Thunder Bay, ON. Muskrat Dam is home to Oji-Cree First Nation residence that has lived in the area for centuries. The community is very resourceful owning and operating its own sawmill. Travel to Muskrat Dam is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal "Winter Road" links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.


Bearskin Lake

The Bearskin Lake JCR patrol was established in 1999 and has 39 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Bearskin Lake has a population of 425 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is an Oji-Cree First Nation community located 425 km north of Sioux Lookout, ON at 53 54 58 N latitude, 90 58 19 W longitude. Three settlements make up the Bearskin Lake First Nation. Originally located on Bearskin Lake, their main community moved to its present site, on Michikan Lake, in the 1930's. The main settlement is accessible only by air except for a few months between January and March when a seasonal winter road allows vehicle access to the Northern Ontario highway system. The main village is situated on the west shore of the lake and all three communities are interconnected by gravel roadways.


Kitchenuhmaykoosib

The Kitchenuhmaykoosib JCR patrol was established in 2002 and has 50 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers and Elders. Kitchenuhmaykoosib, also known as Big Trout Lake or KI, has a population of 1,325 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. Kitchenuhmaykoosib is an Oji-Cree First Nation community located 580kms north of Thunder Bay, ON, on Big Trout Lake. It can be found at 53 82 03 N latitude, 89 70 03 W longitude. Kitchenuhmaykoosib has numerous species of large and small game. The local population utilizes this resource to continue with their traditional hunting and trapping ways. KI is accessible only by air except for the winter months between late January and late March. During this period a seasonal winter road links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.


Webequie

The Webequie JCR patrol was first established in 2003 and has 28 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers, Elders, Adult committee members and a few volunteers. Webequie has a population of 450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52 59 06 N latitude, 87 16 56 W longitude, approximately 540 km north of Thunder Bay, ON. Webequie is an Ojibway community. The people of Webequie were hunters and gatherers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Webequie is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal "Winter Road" links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.


Neskantaga

The Neskantaga JCR patrol was first established in 2004 and has 31 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers and a few volunteers. Neskantaga has a population of 320 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52 19 29 N latitude, 88 02 10 W longitude, 560km north of Thunder Bay ON. Neskantaga is home to the Ojibway First Nation. Members of the community were hunters and gathers and this tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game such as moose, caribou, rabbit, etc. is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Neskantaga is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal "Winter Road" links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.


Fort Severn

The Fort Severn JCR patrol was established in 1999 and has 24 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Fort Severn has a population of 400 people and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. Fort Severn has the distinction of being Ontario's most northern community. Fort Severn is located 8kms south of Hudson Bay along the banks of the Severn River at 56 00 37 N latitude, 87 34 07 W longitude. Fort Severn was established by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1689. Originally the reserve was placed in the Rocksand area at the junction of the Severn and Sachigo Rivers. In 1973, the reserve was relocated to its current location. Travel to Fort Severn is limited to flight year-round. During the winter months a "Winter Road" is constructed that links the community to Shamattawa, Man to the Southwest and Peawanuck, ON to the Southeast.


Peawanuck

The Peawanuck JCR patrol was first established in 1999 and has 16 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Peawanuck has a population of 200 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 55 00 30 N latitude, 85 25 20 W longitude, 35 km up stream from Hudson Bay on the banks of the Winisk River. Peawanuck is a Cree Frist Nation community. The people of Peawanuck were hunters and gatherers and this tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Peawanuck is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal "Winter Road" links the community to Fort Severn, ON and into Manitoba.


Attawapiskat

The Attawapiskat JCR patrol was established in 1999 and has 67 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR program is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers, Adult committee members, Volunteers and Elders. Attawapiskat has a population of 1300 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52 55 59 N latitude, 82 24 00 W longitude, 7kms west of James Bay on the banks of the Attawapiskat River. Attawapiskat is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. The location of the town has been a gathering place for local Native people for centuries. Originally it was a seasonal camp that was visited in the spring and summer to take advantage of the prime fishing on one of the main drainage rivers of James Bay. Access to Attawapiskat for most of the year is mainly limited to flight. During the winter months a "Winter Road" is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.


Kashechewan

The Kashechewan JCR patrol was established in 2002 and has 40 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Kashechewan has population of 1200 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52 15 29 N latitude, 81 39 08 W longitude, 10kms west of James Bay on the Northern banks of the Albany River. Kashechewan is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. Kashechewan has numerous species of large and small game. The local population utilizes this resource to continue with their Traditional hunting and trapping ways. Travel to Kashechewan is limited to flight most of the year. During the winter months a "Winter Road" is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.


Fort Albany

The Fort Albany JCR patrol was established in 1999 and has 22 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers and a few of the Elders. Fort Albany First Nation has a population of 900 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52 15 04 N latitude, 81 30 04 W longitude, 10 kms west of James Bay on the Southern Banks of the Albany River. Fort Albany is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. Old Fort Albany, located 5kms east of the new location, was originally established in 1670 as a Fur trading post by the Hudson's Bay Company. Travel to Fort Albany is limited to flight most of the year. During the winter months a "Winter Road" is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.


Moose factory

The Moose Factory patrol was first established in 1999 and has 40 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers. Moose Factory has a population of 2,400 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 51 26 03 N latitude, 80 59 73 W longitude, 20kms west of the southern west tip of James Bay. Moose Factory is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. It was originally a fur trading post set up by the Hudson Bay Company in the late 1670s. Moose Factory is an Island across the Moose River from the mainland town of Moosonee, ON. It is accessible through rail from Cochrane, ON to Moosonee and by air year-round. Many of the community members still maintain their traditional ways by hunting and fishing regularly.


Constance Lake

The Constance Lake JCR patrol was established in 1999 and has 43 youth that participate in the local and summer JCR Programme. The aim of the JCR Programme is to develop positive attributes in youth. They are taught Traditional, Life and Ranger skills by Canadian Rangers, Adult committee members, Volunteers and Elders. Constance Lake has a population of 700 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is an Oji-Cree community located 35kms west of Hearst, ON just North off Highway 11 at 49 48 43 N latitude, 87 07 44 W longitude. Constance Lake is a progressive and active community that encourages, supports and promotes local business development, job creation and economic development. Constance Lake is accessibly by road year round. Constance Lake reserve lands total 7,686 acres. Wild life is abundant and includes moose, rabbit, beaver, muskrat and mink as well as several species of fish within the nearby rivers.


Ucluelet, BC

Date Opened: April 2008 Number of JCRs: 27 Adult Support: 8 committee members, 2 volunteers The Ucluelet Junior Canadian Ranger patrol reopened in April 2008 after closing in the fall of 2002. JCRs in the Ucluelet patrol participate in swimming and sports nights, drill, outdoor cooking, a community haunted house, camping and visits to the nearby Coast Guard Station. Community of Ucluelet, BC Population: 1 457 Longitude/Latitude: 48°57' N, 125°32' W Ucluelet comes from the First Nations word for "Safe Harbour". The gateway to the Pacific Rim National Park, Ucluelet is home to the Pacific Rim Visitor's Center. Settled in 1870 by fur traders, Ucluelet boasts many outdoor recreation and ecotourism opportunities.


Gold River, BC

Patrol opened: September 2007 Number of JCRs: 18 Adult Support: 2 Committee members, 1 Volunteer Junior Canadian Rangers in Gold River particpate in marksmanship training, drill, camping trips, deer hunting, fishing skills, and winter survival training. The Gold River JCR are active travellors within the Programme. Community of Gold River, BC Population: 1 342 Longtitude/Latitude: 49°46' N, 126°03' W Gold River's community origionally centered around logging and the pulp and paper industries. This has since shifted to ecotourism and fishing. Gold River is the gateway to Nootka sound.


Tahsis, BC

Patrol Opened: September 2007 Number of JCRs: 10 Adult Support: 9 committee members, 3 volunteers Junior Canadian Rangers in Tahsis, BC's patrol participate in sports, games, wilderness and wildlife safety, tracking and marksmanship. Tahsis is a community of 366 located on Vancouver Island at 49°55' N, 126°40' W. Its main industries are fishing and ecotourism. The area is rich with outdoor opportunities, including caving, scuba diving, kayaking and surfing.


Alert Bay, BC

Patrol Opened: December 2000 Number of JCRs: 20 Adult Support: 1 Adult Committee member, 2 Volunteers Alert Bay's Junior Canadian Rangers are quite active in the JCR Programme, including canoeing, map and compass training, knots, beading, and survival skills. Village of Alert Bay Population: 556 Longitude/Latitude: 50°30' N, 126 ° 56' W Alert Bay is a village on Cormorant Island in traditional Kwakwa'waka territory. Both Alert Bay and the island were named after ocean cruisers that surveyed the coast of BC between the years 1846-1861. The island is 3 miles long and ½ mile wide and the village is a center of native culture and art. It also possesses a large ecotourism industry. It is accessible by ferry only. Alert Bay has the largest totem in the world.


Port Mcneill, BC

Date Opened: April 2000 Number of JCRs: 23 Adult Support: 2 Committee members, 3 Volunteers Port McNeill's active Junior Canadian Ranger patrol participates in many activities, including learning Ranger and life skills, weight training, marksmanship with the Daisy Air Rifle, sports, survival training and first aid. Past outings included a tour of HMCS CALGARY and trips to Comox BC. Community of Port McNeill BC Population: 2 623 Longitude/Latitude: 50°35' N, 127°06' W The community of Port McNeill BC was originally established as a base camp for logging operations. The town itself provides 8% of the total harvest of timber in BC. Additionally, Port McNeill is home to the largest sand and gravel quarry in the northern hemisphere.


Bella coola, BC

Patrol Opened: March, 2006 Number of JCRs: 45 Adult Support: 3 Canadian Rangers, Adult committee members Bella Coola Junior Canadian Rangers actively participate in camping, avalanche training, and survival training. In the past they have travelled to other western communities for training and are considered valuable members of the community. Community of Bella Coola Population: 778 Longitude/Latitude: 52°25' N, 126 ° 40' W The Bella Coola Valley encompasses the Bella Coola townsite, Hagensborg, Sloompt, Nusatsum, Firvale and Stuie. Located 100 km inland up the Burke Channel and the North Bentinck Arm of the Pacific Ocean, getting to Bella Coola is an adventure travelling Highway 20 from Williams.


Kitkatla, BC

Date Opened: June 2000 Number of JCRs: 41 Adult Support: 2 committee members, 1 Elder Kitkatla's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active in learning Ranger skills, including camping and land navigation, life skills, including team building activites and traditional skills, encompassing first nations skills of the early peoples. Community of Kitkatla, BC Population: 493 Longitude/Latitude: 43°0' N, 130°0' W The community of Kitkatla, also known as Laxlan, is a remote community located on Dolphin Island in the northern coast area of BC. It is a Tsimshian village approximately 45 km SW of Prince Rupert. The community is only accessible by float plane or boat.


Sandspit, BC

Patrol Opened: September 2000 Number of JCRs: 9 Adult Support: 2 committee members, 1 volunteer Junior Canadian Rangers in Sandspit, BC's patrol participate in sports, games, wilderness and wildlife safety, hikes to watch whales and marksmanship competitions. Sandspit is the largest community on Moresby Island of the Haida Gwaii. A former fishing community, the economic focus is now on transportation and logging. Sandspit is a community of 402 and is located at 53°15' N, 131°49' W.


Masset

Date Opened: March 2001 Number of JCRs: 23 Adult Support: 3 Committee members, 3 Volunteers Masset's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active learning drill, GPS and geocaching, local area tours, water and canoe safety, and hunter/rifle safety through the CORE program (Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education Program within British Columbia). Additionally they are active in the community, participating in the town soapbox derby and Harbour days activities. Town of Masset, BC Population: 940 Longitude/Latitude: 54°01' N, 132°01' W Masset, BC is located on the north tip of Graham Island, the northernmost of the islands that comprise the Haida Gwaii. It is the western mile '0' for the Yellowhead Highway. Masset is a primarily a fishing village.


Port Simpson - Lax k'walaams, BC

Date Opened: March 2007 Number of JCRs: 13 Adult Support: 3 Committee members, 1 Volunteer Port Simpson (Lax K'walaams)'s patrol is active in teaching Ranger skills such as camping and wilderness survival, traditional skills and life skills. Community of Port Simpson - Lax K'walaams, BC Population: 679 Longitude/Latitude: 54°30' N, 130°20' W The community of Port Simpson, BC, also known as Lax K'walaams, is a primarily First Nations community near Prince Rupert, BC. The townsite was originally an HBC outpost. Its name comes from the Tsimshian language and means "place of wild roses".


Telkwa, BC

Date Opened: September 2001 Number of JCRs: 33 Adult Support: 6 committee members, 4 volunteers Telkwa's Junior Canadian Rangers participate in salmon fishing and making traditional smoked salmon, marksmanship, canoeing, drill, tracking and learning search and rescue techniques. As well, this patrol has particpiated in joint activities with other JCR. Community of Telwka, BC Population: 1 295 Longitude/Latitude: 45°41' N, 127°5' W Telkwa is located on the banks of the Buckley and Telkwa Rivers, 18 KM south of Smithers. Industries in this area mainly revolve around forestry, agriculture and outdoor adventure tourism.


Dease Lake

Patrol opened: September 2001 Number of JCRs: 12 Adult Support: 2 Committee members Originally located in Telegraph Cove, the patrol moved to Dease Lake in April 2008. Junior Canadian Rangers in Dease Lake participate in camping and survival training and are valuable members of the community for events such as the Canada Day parade. Dease Lake is a mining and fishing community of 68 people, located at 58°25' N, 130°06 W.


Hudson's Hope, BC

Patrol Opened: March, 2000. Number of JCRs: 23 Adult Support: 7 Committee members, 4 Volunteers Junior Canadian Ranger's in Hudson's Hope, BC have particpated in many activities, including sports, confidence/challenge courses, skidooing, canoing, rapelling and marksmanship competitions. They have also placed several Geocaches around the area, one of which has traveled to South America, Europe and Africa. They have traveled to Manitoba, Ontario, Yukon, Alberta and several locations in British Columbia, including Comox, Strathcona, Kikatla, and the Haida Gwai for JCR gatherings.


Pouce Coupe, BC

Patrol Opened: May 2003 Number of JCRs: 24 Adult support: 3 Committee members, 3 Volunteers JCR in Pouce Coupe participate in geocaching, map and compass training, hiking, camping and survival training, including building improvised shelters and cooking without a fire. They also participate in marksmanship competitions. Pouce Coupe is a community of 739 located at 55°40' N, 120°10' W; approximately 10 KM NW of Dawson's Creek.


Tumbler Ridge, BC

Date Opened: May 2003 Number of JCRs: 10 Adult Support: 1 committee member Tumbler Ridge's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active in teaching Ranger skills such as camping and wilderness survival. The patrol is also active in community events such as Remembrance Day services. Community of Tumbler Ridge, BC Population: 2,454 Longitude/Latitude: 54°45' N, 121°11' W Tumbler Ridge is located approximately 1 104 KM NE of Vancouver on a plateau above the Murray and Wolverine Rivers. Tumbler Ridge is host to a resource based economy with activity in the coal mining, construction and manufacturing sectors. Tumbler Ridge has had incredible dinosaur discoveries and an amazing museum, hiking and skiing trails that are beyond words.


Valemount

Patrol Opened: February 2008 Number of JCRs: 0 Adult support: 1 Committee member Junior Canadian Rangers in Valemount, BC particpate in camping and survival training, learning Ranger skills, life skills and traditionnal skills. Valemount is a community in East Central BC, situated in the Rocky, Monashee and Cariboo Mountains. The gateway to nearby Jasper National Park, Valemount is an outdoor recreation community. It is located 52°50' N, 119°15 W and has a population of 1 018.


Grande cache, AB

Date Opened: October 2009 Number of JCRs: 15 Adult Support: 7 Committee members A young patrol, Grande Cache's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is 15 members strong and active in learning Ranger skills, traditional skills and life skills. Their activites include sports, survival training and camping. Town of Grande Cache, AB Population: 3 783 Longitude/Latitude: 53°53' N, 119°08' W The community of Grande Cache, AB is primarily supported by surface and underground mining for coal. Additionally, the town boasts a developing wilderness tourism industry. Grande Cache is located approximately 435 km west of Edmonton and recently celebrated its 40th anniversary.


Fort Vermilion, AB

Patrol opened: April 2006 Number of JCRs: 32 Adult Support: 7 Committee members, 4 Volunteers Fort Vermilion's Junior Canadian Rangers are very active in the community, playing hockey and participating in sports, survival skills, setting trap lines, hunting trips and giving support and assistance to the Canadian Rangers. Hamlet of Fort Vermilion, AB. Population: 1326 in urban and rural areas Longtitude/Latitude: 58°24' N, 116 ° 58' W Fort Vermilion is located on the banks of the Peace River. Established in 1788 by fur trading companies, the community's name comes from the red ochre deposites along the river banks. It is one of the oldest settlements in Alberta.


Fort Chipewyan

Patrol Opened: September 2006 Number of JCRs: 20 Adult Support: 2 Committee Members, 2 Elders Junior Canadian Rangers in Fort Chipewyan, AB learn Ranger skills, life skills and cultural skills. Past activities have included camping and survival training. Skills also include - Hunting, Fishing and Drumming. Fort Chipewyan has a population of 915 and is located at 58°46'N, 111°07'W. The unincorporated community is one of the oldest European settlements in Alberta. It was established by the North West.


Fond du lac, SK

Patrol Opened: September 2006 Number of JCRs: 21 Adult Support: 2 Elders and 3 Adult Committee Members Fond du Lac's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active with sports, snow shoeing, camping and cultural activities. Activities also include Community Service, hunting and survival. Past cultural activities including making bannock, learning to dry meat, learning how to clean and gut a fish, and learning how to set rabbit snares. Community of Fond du Lac, SK Population: 801 Latitude/Longitude: 59°17'N, 106°00'W Fond du Lac is located on the eastern shores of Athabasca Lake in Northern Saskatchewan. It is primarily a first nations community, with access by air or winter road 2-3 months of year. Hunting and trapping compliment local industries such as fishing and mining.


Lac brochet, MB

Date Opened: September 2002 Number of JCRs: 44 Adult Support: 7 committee members, 1 elder Lac Brochet's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active in learning drill, playing sports, traditional Dene drumming and Indian games, teambuilding exercises, bannock making and camping. The patrol provided support to Ex Western Spirit. Community of Lac Brochet, MB Population: 604 Longitude/Latitude: 48°16' N, 72°11' W The Community of Lac Brochet, MB is a remote, predominately First Nations community located in North-western Manitoba. The community is accessible via airplane from the nearby Lac Brochet airfield or by the busy winter road 2-3 months of the year.


Lynn Lake

Patrol Opened: January 2001 Number of JCRs: 24 Adult Support: 4 Committee members Junior Canadian Ranger's in Lynn Lake participate in a variety of activities, including survival training, skidooing, setting trails, drill, cariboo hunting and skating. Lynn Lake is a community 1 100 KM NW of Winnipeg. Originally a mining community, it now supports mineral exploration, and ecotourism. The community boasts world class angling and hunting. With a population of 714, Lynn Lake is located at 56°51' N, 101°03 W.


Snow Lake, MB

Date Opened: March 2006 Number of JCRs: 15 Adult Support: 5 Committee members, 1 Volunteer Snow Lake's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol participates in map reading, card making, poppy sales and participation in the community Remembrance Day parade. JCR's provide the, community haunted house at Halloween, and are excellent at drill. Community of Snow Lake, MB Population: 837 Longitude/Latitude: 54°52' N, 100°03' W Snow Lake, MB began as a gold mining community, and has expanded its mineral exploration for gold, zinc and copper. Located midway between Thompson, Flin Flon and the Pas, Snow Lake is approximately 685 KM N of Winnipeg.


Churchill, MB

Patrol Opened: January, 2003 Number of JCRs: 15 Adult Support: 8 Committee members, 1 Elder Junior Canadian Rangers in Churchill participate in activities such as camping trips, hunting, survival training, and marksmanship with the Daisy Air Rifle. Town of Churchill, MB Population: 923 Longitude/Latitude: 58°42' N, 98°12' W The town of Churchill, Manitoba is located on the shores of Hudson's Bay. It is the self-proclaimed Polar Bear and Beluga capital of the world. A popular location for ecotourism and arctic research; the community is a center for transportation, mining, and commercial fishing. Today evidence remains of the Pre-Dorset, Dorset and Inuit peoples that used this area as seasonal hunting grounds for thousands for years.


Shamattawa, MB

Date Opened: September 2009 Number of JCRs: 37 Adult Support: 8 committee members Shamattawa's Junior Canadian Ranger patrol is active in learning Ranger skills, including camping and land navigation, life skills, including team building activites and traditional skills, encompassing traditional first nations skills. Community of Shamattawa, MB Population: 920 Longitude/Latitude: 55°52' N, 92°0' W The remote community of Shamattawa is a primarily First Nations community located in northern Manitoba. Sitting on the shores of God's River, Shamattawa is accessible only by air and by winter ice road. Shamattawa was a former HBC York Factory outpost.


St Teresa point, MB

Date Opened: March 2007 Number of JCRs: 30 Adult Support: 11 Committee members, 1 Volunteer Junior Canadian Rangers in St Teresa Point's patrol participate in trips to BC, ice fishing, and traditional skills such as learning to live off the land. They are active hunters and enjoy snowmobiling. Community of St Teresa Point, MB Population: 2 184 Longitude/Latitude: 53°50' N, 94°50' W St Teresa Point is a primarily First Nations community located in Manitoba on the southern shore of Island Lake. This remote community is accessible only by air or winter ice road.


Churchill Falls

The JCR patrol was opened in 2001. It currently has 15 JCRs enrolled. It is supported by the Canadian Rangers who provide the Patrol Leader, 2IC and 3IC and also has an Adult committee of four. The JCRs will receive training this year in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. The patrol also participates in community based training in Daisy Air rifle, GPS, PHASE and Map and Compass. Churchill Falls is located 245 Km east of Labrador City in central Labrador. It began as a construction site in 1967 for a hydro electric development on the mighty Churchill River and developed into a town whose residents now provide the workforce for the Churchill Falls Hydro Electric Development. It has a population of 650 persons.


Hopedale

The Hopedale JCR patrol was stood up in 2002. The current enrolment is 16 JCRs. The patrol is supported by a Patrol Leader, 2IC and 3IC from the Canadian Ranger patrol in Hopedale. They also have an Adult Committee of 6 persons. This year, the JCRs will complete training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. In community based training they have done the Daisy Air Rifle, GPS and been involved in community events. Hopedale is located on the north coast of Labrador. Its coordinates are 55°29'2.50'N 60°12'11.48'W. It is the legislative capital of the Nunatsiavut government. It was founded by the Moravian Missionaries in 1782 as a fishing and whaling station. Its current population is approximately 625.


Postville

The community of Postville (originally called "The Post") is located on the northeast coast of Labrador, approx 110 air miles north-northeast of Happy Valley Goose Bay. It has a current population of about 250. It began as a trading post in the 1930s. Today it depends on the local sawmill and fishery. There is also some mining exploration in the area. The Postville JCR patrol was stood up in 2000. They currently have an enrolment of 18 JCRs with an adult committee of nine persons. They are supported by the Postville Canadian Ranger Patrol. This year the JCRs will have completed training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety Skills.


Makkovik

The Makkovik JCR patrol was stood up in 2003. Its present enrolment is 19 JCRs. They are well supported by the Makkovik Canadian Rangers and have a large Adult Committee of 12 persons. This year the JCRs will have received training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They are also active in their community, taking part in community events, as well as learning to use the Daisy Air Rifle, GPS, Map and Compass and taking part in the PHASE program. The community of Makkovik is located on the North Coast of Labrador, about 215 Km northeast of Happy Valley-Goose Bay. It's coordinates are 55°07'N 59°03'W. It has a present population of approximately 360. Makkovik began in 1860 as a trading post. The Moravians established a mission there in 1896. The early settlers were hunters, trappers and fishermen. The fishery is the largest employer in the community today.


Rigolet

Rigolet is located on the northeast coast of Labrador at the entrance to Hamilton Inlet 160 Km east of Happy Valley-Goose Bay. Its coordinates are 54°10'N 58°26'W. It has a population of approx 350. Rigolet was established as a trading post in 1735. Today the community depends on some commercial seal hunting and trapping as well as the tourism industry. The Rigolet JCR patrol was established in 2005. It has a present enrolment of eight JCRs, with an Adult Committee of six. The patrol is supported by the Rigolet Canadian Ranger Patrol. This year the JCRs will have completed training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety.


Cartwright

The Cartwright JCR Patrol was stood up in 2003. It currently has 36 JCRs. The patrol has excellent CR and community support with an adult committee of 10 members plus other community volunteers. The JCRs will receive training this year in Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. The patrol is also quite active, meeting weekly and doing activities such as Daisy Air Rifle, Map and Compass, and PHASE and have constructed a komatik and made snowshoes. Cartwright is located on the Labrador coast, 150 miles east of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, at the mouth of Sandwich Bay. It was founded in 1755 by Captain Cartwright as a fishing and fur trading post. The Hudson Bay Company was established in 1837 and is still in operation today. Cartwright today is a main shipping port as well as operating the Labrador Shrimp Company, one of the town's main employers. The population is approximately 600.


Black Tickle

The Black Tickle JCR Patrol was stood up in 2000 and has been an active patrol since its inception. In recent years the numbers of JCRs has declined due to declining population in the community. It presently sits at 9 JCRs. The patrol receives good support from the Canadian Rangers with a Patrol Leader, 2IC and 3IC. They also have four members on their Adult Committee. This year the patrol has been given training in Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and the Sled Smart Snowmobile Safety Course. They have also done community training which includes, Daisy Air Rifle, GPS, and the PHASE Program. Black Tickle is located on an island 60 kilometres offshore from Cartwright at the mouth of Sandwich Bay in Labrador. It is a community of approximately 230 people. It began as a fishing community in the mid 1800's and fishing is still the reason for its existence today.


Port Hope Simpson

Port Hope Simpson is located on the southeastern coast of Labrador. It is on Route 510 of the Trans Labrador Highway, approx 215 km from the Quebec/Labrador border. Its coordinates are 52°32'N 56°18'W. It has a population of 530. The town was founded in 1934 as a logging camp but today fishing, boat building as well as tourism are its mainstays economically. The port Hope Simpson JCR patrol was opened in 2001. It currently has 36 JCRs and is supported by the Canadian Ranger Patrol. It has an Adult Committee of 6 with 12 other volunteers. This year the JCRs will have received training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They are active in Community Based Training with the Daisy Air Rifle, GPS, Map and Compass and the PHASE program. As well they are involved in community events such as Remembrance Day and Christmas celebrations.


Mary's Harbour

The Mary's Harbour JCR patrol was stood up in 2008. It has an enrolment of 60 JCRs. It is supported by Canadian Rangers from the Port Hope Simpson Canadian Ranger Patrol. They have an Adult Committee of 12 and up to 30 volunteers. This year, the JCRs will have received training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They are also very active in their community based training. Mary's Harbour is located on the southeast coast of Labrador along Route 510 (Trans Labrador Highway) approx 172 km from the Quebec/Labrador border. It has a population of 475. The community of Mary's Harbour was settled in the 1930s after a fire at Battle Harbour and it has been the site of a salmon fishery since the 1780s. The fishery was and still is the main industry of this town.


Labrador Straits

The Labrador Straits JCR patrol was stood up in 2000 and was the first patrol in NL. It presently has 30 JCRs who are supported by the Red Bay Canadian Ranger Patrol. They have ten Adult Committee and volunteers. This year, the JCRs will have received training in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They also participated in community based training on the Daisy Air Rifle, Map and Compass, GPS, constructing a komatik and PHASE program, as well as being involved in community events. Labrador Straits consists of communities along the south cost of Labrador from L'Anse Au Clair to Red Bay, a distance of 76 Km. The community of Forteau is the home base for this patrol. This area dates back to the 1700s as a fishing and whaling site, but the community of Red Bay goes back to 1550, as a Basque whaling site. The population of the Lab Straits area is approximately 1400.


Port Saunders

Port Saunders is a patrol which consists of 23 small communities along the west side of the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland. It goes from Castor River in the South to Eddies Cove in the north a distance of approx 80 Kms. Two of the larger communities in this area, Flowers Cove and Plum Point, are the focal points for this patrol and have a combined population of about 600. This area started to be settled in the 1850s mainly due to fishing and fishing is still a mainstay of the economy today. The JCR patrol, our newest, was stood up in 2009. Its current enrolment is 99. It is supported by the Canadian Rangers of the Port Saunders Patrol. There is an Adult Committee of 20 plus another 20 volunteers. This year the JCRs will have completed training in Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They have also been active in community events.


Buchans

Buchans opened a JCR patrol in 2001. They presently have 23 JCRs and enjoy good support from the Canadian Rangers. They also have four members on their Adult Committee. The Buchans JCRs will have completed training this year in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety Training. They are also active in their community, getting involved in Remembrance Day activities and Christmas celebrations. Buchans is located in the central part of the island of Newfoundland on the shore of Red Indian Lake. It is on route 370, 72 Km off the Trans Canada Highway. Its coordinates are 48°49'30"N 56°51'30"W. It began as a mining town in the early 1900s and has a present population of approx 850. The mine closed in the 1980s and today's main industry is tourism.


Gaultois

The Gaultois JCR patrol was stood up in 2002. At that time it had a large number of JCRs but with decline in population it presently sits at 9 JCRs. They are supported by the Hermitage Canadian Ranger patrol and have an Adult Committee of 8 members. Gaultois JCRs will have completed training this year in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They conduct community training on the Daisy Air Rifle, Map and Compass, GPS and PHASE program. Gaultois is an island community in Fortune Bay on the south coast of the island of Newfoundland. It is a short 20 minute ferry ride across the bay from Hermitage. Its coordinates are 47°36'N 55°55'W. The community was settled in late 1700s as a fishing and whaling centre. Fishing is still its mainstay but with the decline in the fishery there has been a corresponding decline in population. There are approx 265 residents at present.


Conne River

The Conne River JCR Patrol was stood up in 2001. They presently have an enrolment of 40 JCRs. They are supported by the Milltown Canadian Ranger Patrol and have an active Adult Committee with 8 members. The JCRs will have received training this year in Canadian Ranger Skills, Traditional Skills and Snowmobile Safety. They also do community based training in Daisy Air Rifle, GPS, PHASE, as well as traditional crafts such as making mittens and traditional drums. Conne River (Miawpukek) is a First Nation's Reserve located in Bay D' Espoir on the south coast of the island of Newfoundland. It was recognized by the NL government as a native community in 1973. Residents are of the Mi'kmaw band and were recognized as an official Indian Act Band in 1984. Their population is approx 730.

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